MARLEY LTD

LICHFIELD ROAD
BRANSTON
BURTON ON TRENT
STAFFORDSHIRE DE14 3HD

Tel: 01283 722588
Fax: 01283 722219

Company Logo

Suppliers of: Roof Tiles & Slates, Roofing Accessories, Cedar Shingles, Rafters, Decking, Integrated PV Photovoltaic Panels for Pitched Roofs.

Marley Range of Roofing Products & Systems

Marley is at the forefront of the roofing industry in the UK, with over 100 years of roofing expertise and heritage. We are the only UK manufacturer offering all elements of a roofing system including: Clay and concrete tiles, Shingles, Roofing accessories and BS 5534 compliant JB Red Batten.

Our complete pitched roofing solution comes with an unrivalled 15 year guarantee, offering you complete peace of mind. Our innovative and market-leading products also include a range of TDCA approved timber decking, which have been awarded the ’DeckMark’ accreditation.

All our products are supported by a wide range of easily accessible technical services and expert support for customers from all areas of the construction industry. We offer flexible, efficient service that saves our customers time and money on their projects and we’re even accredited by the Institute of Customer Service for our commitment to delivering the best possible customer experience. So whatever you need, we’re confident that we can provide the right solution and our online portal makes it quick and easy to get in touch with us.

Marley Roof Coverings

Marley SolarTile® roof-integrated solar tiles:

Marley SolarTile® is a roof-integrated solar panel solution, enhancing roof system specification with design flexibility, sleek aesthetics, industry leading wind and fire performance while acting as both a roof covering and electricity generating solution.

Clay Roof Tiles:

Marley offer a wide range of Clay roof Tiles and Accessories for all types of pitched roof construction

Concrete Roof Tiles:

Marley manufacture an extensive range of Concrete Roof Tiles and Accessories for all types of roof construction

Shingles & Shakes:

Marley offer a range of Western Red Cedar Shingles & Shakes which are fully sustainable and treated for durability

 

Roofing Base Layers

JB Red Batterns:

All JB Red roofing battens are supplied graded to meet the performance requirements of BS 5534.

Roofing Underlays:

Marley offer a wide range of roofing underlays, membranes and Accessories for all types of roof construction.

 

Roofing Finishes & Accessories

From Eaves Vents to Ridge Gullies, Marley offer an extensive range of Roof Finishes and Accessories for all types of roof construction.

 

Marley Decking

Marley also supply a wide range of Decking Systems including Anti-Slip premium decking available in assorted sizes for all types of Decking Specifications.

 

Further Technical information is available to download from the BPi Products Library or from the Manufacturer’s own website

CLADDING TILES Clay .
CLADDING TILES Clay Handmade
CLADDING TILES Concrete .
CLADDING TILES Concrete/Acrylic .
CLADDINGS EXTERNAL Timber .
CLADDINGS EXTERNAL Timber Cedar Shingles
CLADDINGS EXTERNAL Wood .
DECKING Commercial .
DECKING Slip Resistant/Anti-Slip/Low Slip .
DECKING Timber CE Marked
DECKING Timber EN 14081
DECKING Timber European Softwood
DECKING Timber FSC/PEFC Chain of Custody Certified
DOWNPIPES . See Also RAINWATER PIPES:
DRY HIP SYSTEMS AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
DRY RIDGE SYSTEMS .
DRY RIDGE SYSTEMS AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
DRY RIDGE SYSTEMS Concrete Tiles .
DRY RIDGE SYSTEMS Ventilated .
DRY VALLEY SYSTEMS AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
DRY VALLEY SYSTEMS GRP .
DRY VERGE SYSTEMS AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
DRY VERGE SYSTEMS BS EN 490 Kitemarked .
DRY VERGE SYSTEMS PVC-u .
DRY VERGE SYSTEMS Tile Roofing Concrete Profiled Tiles .
EAVES Filler Pieces .
EAVES Filler Pieces PVC-u
EAVES VENTS Bird Control .
EAVES VENTS BS 5250:2002 .
EAVES VENTS BS 5534 .
FINIALS Clay .
FIRE BARRIERS Roofing Applications .
FIRE BARRIERS Roofing Applications BS EN 1363-1 2012
FIRE BARRIERS Roofing Applications Intumescent Firestops
FIRE BARRIERS Roofing Applications Party Wall Compartmentation
FIRESTOPS Roofing Applications Intumescent Fire Barriers
FLUE TERMINALS Gas Terminals .
GUTTERS PVC-u .
PANTILES Clay .
PANTILES Concrete .
RIDGE Trim System .
RIDGE Ventilating Terminals ..
RIDGE Ventilating Terminals AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS
RIDGE Ventilating Terminals BS 5534/5250
RIDGE Ventilating Terminals Gas
RIDGE Ventilating Terminals Soil Vent Pipe
ROOF Abutments Vent Strip .
ROOF Complete Systems .
ROOF Mechanical Vent Systems .
ROOF TILE Clips .
ROOF TILE Clips BS 5534
ROOF TILE Fittings and Accessories .
ROOF TILE Fixings .
ROOF TILES AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
ROOF TILES Clay .
ROOF TILES Clay BRE Green Guide A+ Rating
ROOF TILES Clay BS 5534
ROOF TILES Clay BS EN 1304 Kitemarked
ROOF TILES Clay BS EN 1304:1998
ROOF TILES Clay Coloured
ROOF TILES Clay Double Camber
ROOF TILES Clay Double Roman
ROOF TILES Clay Feature
ROOF TILES Clay Flat Interlocking
ROOF TILES Clay Handmade
ROOF TILES Clay Handmade Appearance
ROOF TILES Clay Handmade Appearance Distressed Edges
ROOF TILES Clay Interlocking
ROOF TILES Clay Large Format
ROOF TILES Clay Ornamental
ROOF TILES Clay Pantile
ROOF TILES Clay Peg
ROOF TILES Clay Plain
ROOF TILES Clay Sandfaced
ROOF TILES Clay Smoothfaced
ROOF TILES Clay Weathered Appearance
ROOF TILES Concrete .
ROOF TILES Concrete Acrylic Surfaced
ROOF TILES Concrete Anti-Pollution / NOx Reducing Coating
ROOF TILES Concrete Anti-Pollution Coating
ROOF TILES Concrete BES 6001 Responsible Sourcing Standard
ROOF TILES Concrete BRE Green Guide A+ Rating
ROOF TILES Concrete BS 473/550:1990
ROOF TILES Concrete BS 5534
ROOF TILES Concrete BS EN 490:2011 Kitemarked
ROOF TILES Concrete Clay Tile Appearance
ROOF TILES Concrete Double Pantile
ROOF TILES Concrete Double Roman
ROOF TILES Concrete Feature
ROOF TILES Concrete Granular Finish
ROOF TILES Concrete Handmade Appearance
ROOF TILES Concrete Interlocking
ROOF TILES Concrete Lightweight
ROOF TILES Concrete Low Pitch
ROOF TILES Concrete Pantile
ROOF TILES Concrete Plain
ROOF TILES Concrete Refurbishment
ROOF TILES Concrete Riven Appearance
ROOF TILES Concrete Rustic Appearance
ROOF TILES Concrete Slate Appearance
ROOF TILES Concrete Slate Appearance Weathered Effect
ROOF TILES Concrete Smooth
ROOF TILES Concrete Special Colours
ROOF TILES Double Camber .
ROOF TILES Double Roman .
ROOF TILES Feature .
ROOF TILES Filler Units .
ROOF TILES Interlocking .
ROOF TILES Jointing between different Tiles, Bonding Gutter Joint Gutter between different Tiles
ROOF TILES Low Pitch .
ROOF TILES Monoridge .
ROOF TILES Pantiles .
ROOF TILES Plain .
ROOF TILES Pollutant Removal NOx Reducing Coating
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles .
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Block End
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Clay
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Crested Ridge
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Finials
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Gas Flue
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Gas Flue BS 5534
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Ornamental
ROOF TILES Ridge Tiles Ventilating
ROOF TILES Terminal Gas Ridge .
ROOF TILES Trough Valley .
ROOF TILES Ventilation Ventilating .
ROOF TILES Ventilation Ventilating BS 5250
ROOF TILES Ventilation Ventilating BS 5534
ROOF TRIM Abutment Flashing Units BS 5534
ROOF TRIM Abutment Gutters Soakers BS 5534
ROOF TRIM Abutment Gutters Soakers Dry Fix
ROOF TRIM Abutment Ventilation Systems .
ROOF TRIM Cloaked Verge .
ROOF TRIM Dry Hip Systems .
ROOF TRIM Dry Ridge Systems .
ROOF TRIM Dry Valley Systems .
ROOF TRIM Dry Verge Systems .
ROOF TRIM For Clay Tiles .
ROOF TRIM For Concrete Tiles .
ROOF TRIM For Fibre Cement Slates .
ROOF TRIM For Slates .
ROOF TRIM GRP .
ROOF TRIM Hip Systems Security Hip Fixing Systems
ROOF TRIM Interlocking .
ROOF TRIM PVC-u .
ROOF TRIM Ridge Systems .
ROOF TRIM Ridge Systems Security Ridge Fixing Systems
ROOF TRIM Slate Verge .
ROOF VALLEYS Troughs Gutters
ROOF VALLEYS Troughs GRP Gutters GRP
ROOF VALLEYS Troughs GRP BS 5534 .
ROOF VENTILATION In-Line .
ROOF VENTILATORS Abutments .
ROOF VENTILATORS AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
ROOF VENTILATORS BS 5250 .
ROOF VENTILATORS BS 5534 .
ROOF VENTILATORS Dry Ridge .
ROOF VENTILATORS Dry Verge .
ROOF VENTILATORS Eaves .
ROOF VENTILATORS Ridge Roll .
ROOF VENTILATORS Ridge Terminal .
ROOF VENTILATORS Tile Vents .
ROOF VENTILATORS Vent Terminal .
ROOFING ACCESSORIES AND FITTINGS See Also ROOF TRIM: .
ROOFING BATTENS
ROOFING BATTENS Timber .
ROOFING BATTENS Timber AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS
ROOFING BATTENS Timber BS 5534
ROOFING BATTENS Timber FSC Certified
ROOFING BATTENS Timber LABC Registered
ROOFING BATTENS Timber PEFC Certified
ROOFING MEMBRANES Breather See Also ROOFING UNDERLAYS: PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES
ROOFING MEMBRANES Pitched Roof Underlay Undertiling Underslating See Also ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES:
ROOFING SHINGLES See Also SHINGLES: .
ROOFING SYSTEMS .
ROOFING SYSTEMS Breathing Roof BS 5250 .
ROOFING SYSTEMS Dry Fix Systems .
ROOFING SYSTEMS Dry Fix Systems AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS
ROOFING SYSTEMS Dry Fix Systems BS 5250
ROOFING SYSTEMS Dry Fix Systems BS 5534
ROOFING SYSTEMS Dry Fix Systems BS 8612: 2018
ROOFING SYSTEMS Mitred Hip BS 5534 .
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS .
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES BS 5250:2002 .
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES BS 5534 .
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES Cold Roofs .
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES Non-Permeable Non Permeable
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES Undertile .
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES Undertiling Underslating AGREMENT CERTIFICATE HOLDERS
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES Vapour Permeable Breather Type
ROOFING UNDERLAYS PITCHED ROOF MEMBRANES Warm Roofs .
ROOFLINE Eaves Vents .See Also EAVES VENTS:
ROOFSPACE Ventilation Tiles .
SHAKES Wood Western Red Cedar
SHINGLES Wood .
SHINGLES Wood Cedar
SHINGLES Wood PEFC Chain of Custody
SOFFITS Fibre Cement .
SOFFITS Ventilated .
SOLAR HEATING Collectors .
SOLAR PANELS IEC 61215 .
SOLAR PANELS IEC 61730 .
SOLAR PANELS In-Roof Installation PV Photovoltaic Modules
SOLAR PANELS Integrated Roof Installation .
SOLAR PANELS PV (Photovoltaic) Modules .
SOLAR PANELS PV (Photovoltaic) Modules Integrated Panels for Pitched Roofs
SOLAR PANELS PV (Photovoltaic) Modules Slate and Roof Tile Integration
VENTILATION Soffits .
ACME DOUBLE CAMBER Clay Plain Roof Tiles
ACME SINGLE CAMBER Clay Plain Roof Tiles
ANGLIA Roof Tiles
ANTI-SLIP PLUS Timber Decking
ASHDOWNE Clay Plain Roof Tiles
ASHDOWNE ASHURST Clay Plain Roof Tiles
ASHDOWNE AYLESHAM MIX Clay Plain Roof Tiles
ASHMORE Concrete Roof Tiles
ASHMORE Dry Verge Systems
BURFORD Handmade Tiles
CANTERBURY Clay Roof Tiles
CENTURY Clay Plain Roof Tiles
CHAILEY Handmade Tiles
CITIDECK Timber Decking
CITIDECK Low Slip Decking
DOUBLE ROMAN Cloak Verge Systems
DOUBLE ROMAN Concrete Roof Tiles
DRY FIX Dry Verge/Ridge Fixing System
DUO EDGEMERE Concrete Roof Slate
DUO MODERN Concrete Roof Tile
ECOLOGIC LUDLOW MAJOR Concrete Roof Tiles
EDEN Clay Roof Tiles
EDGEMERE Roof Tiles
EDGEMERE Dry Verge Systems
FLEXFAST Roof Flashing
HAWKINS Clay Roof Tiles
HAWKINS STAFFORDSHIRE Clay Roof Tiles
HIPFAST Dry Hip Systems
JB ANTISLIP PLUS Decking
JB CITIDECK Decking
JB RED Roofing Battens
LINCOLN Clay Roof Tiles
LOXLEIGH Handmade Tiles
LUDLOW MAJOR Concrete Interlocking Roof Tiles
LUDLOW PLUS Concrete Roof Tiles
MARLEY SOLARTILE Integrated Photovoltaic Panels for Pitched Roofs
MENDIP Pantile
MENDIP Cloak Verge Systems
MODERN Concrete Roof Tiles
MODERN Cloak Verge Systems
MOSBOROUGH RED Concrete Roof Tiles
PLAIN Concrete Roof Tiles
RIDGE ROLL Continuous Ridge Ventilation
RIDGEFAST Dry Ridge Systems
RIVEN EDGEMERE Interlocking Roof Tiles
ROOF DEFENCE Roof Fire Barriers
SolarTile® Integrated Photovoltaic Panels for Pitched Roofs
SOLOFIX Tile Fixing System
TILEFIX Roof Fixing Specification Service
UNIVERSAL Dry Fix Ventilating Ridge & Hip
UNIVERSAL Roofing Accessories
WESSEX Concrete Roof Tiles

Launch of the fully revised British Standard BS 5250

November 2021

The launch of the fully revised British Standard, BS 5250, aims to address all sources of moisture within buildings and the associated impacts to the building fabric and occupants’ health by preventing them from becoming breeding grounds for health hazards such as mould spores and spreading infections.

BS 5250:2021 replaces BS 5250:2011 + A1 2016 and gives new guidance on preventing moisture risk in buildings, including pitched roofs. The revised Standard was launched on 29 July and has been re-named ‘Management of Moisture in Buildings – Code of Practice’ to reflect its new, integrated whole building approach, which considers the interactions between the fabric, services, and occupants.

While former editions of the Standard focussed mainly on condensation, the new guidance has been broadened to include other moisture problems such as excessive humidity, rising damp, rain penetration and roof leaks. It also recognises that, in both new and existing buildings, the gap between the design on paper and the way it performs when it is built and in use may vary significantly, particularly due to modern building methods and climate change.

The revised Standard represents best practice in terms of assessing, controlling, and preventing the risk of moisture in buildings, giving both design and practical recommendations.

Stuart Nicholson, roof systems director at Marley, explains: “The changes that are introduced in BS 5250 recognise the fact that buildings are coming under increasing stress from excess moisture, not only from climate change, with increasingly high rainfall and flooding risk, but also due to improved energy efficiency, causing greater humidity in buildings.

“We have been advising about the risks associated with moisture and the importance of adequate ventilation for many years now. The revised BS 5250 is an important step forward because it adopts a whole building approach to reducing the risk of excess moisture. Pitched roofing has a critical role to play in this integrated guidance and in the revised Standard, roofs are covered in greater depth than before and the different moisture risks between roof types are explained in detail. Importantly, it shows that roof ventilation should not be seen as an add on but is an important part of the whole building approach to managing moisture. This will help to prevent damage to buildings from different types of excess moisture and reduce the harmful risk to occupants’ health from inadequate ventilation levels.”

When designing pitched roofing, the natural movement of air within a building means there is a permanent risk of moisture laden air in the form of vapour, likely to ascend to the roof space. It is almost impossible to create an air-tight envelope, so specifications must provide minimum levels of ventilation to the roof void, in combination with a vapour permeable underlay and air open roof covering to ensure there is minimal risk of condensation within the roof build up.

When it comes to managing moisture in pitched roofs, much of the guidance from the previous BS 5250:2016 still applies. However, there are some changes in the revised Standard, including:

• Clearer advice on the use of high resistance and low resistance underlays, as well as air and vapour control layers, when used with air permeable and air impermeable roof coverings.

• New guidance on the calculation methods for assessing moisture risk in roofs in the form of a table relevant for ‘as designed in theory’ (ADT) and ‘as-built in service’ (ABS) conditions for various pitched, flat, and composite roof types.

• Designers are alerted to minimise the risk of surface condensation on the ceiling of any occupied spaces by ensuring that thermal insulation is continuous and that thermal bridging at roof / wall junctions and around openings is minimised.

• Design considerations should now take account of internal finishes and ceilings, particularly the importance of maintaining air tightness to prevent the transfer of most air into colder roof voids.

• More focus on the importance of sealing openings and minimising thermal bridging at the eaves.

Stuart Nicholson adds: “It is important all roofing specifications are reviewed to make sure they are in line with the new guidance and calculation methods. If in doubt, specifiers can contact our technical team who can provide advice and full roof system specifications to ensure correct ventilation levels and reduce moisture risk.”

Read our in depth review of BS 5250 via our website at: https://www.marley.co.uk/blog/launch-of-the-fully-revised-british-standard-bs-5250

The path to net zero starts up on the roof

November 2021

As social housing landlords grapple with decarbonisation, the need to invest in the right technology is vital. Big decisions made now are likely to have long-term implications. But with the government still to fully outline the best technologies to make homes more energy efficient, landlords are faced with the quandary of which systems to invest in. They have to balance their journey to net zero with ensuring they don’t make costly mistakes that could catch up with them down the line. With changes to Part L of the building regulations coming in next year that will affect all new build homes, Inside Housing spoke to Stuart Nicholson, roof systems director at Marley, the roofing manufacturer.

With the changes to building regulations in England, what should housing associations think about?
They’re going to have to incorporate energy-saving technologies when they are building new homes. They can use any technology, and there are lots available, but one of the easiest and most cost-effective routes would be to use solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. As well as being cost-effective, solar panels are readily available and a known technology. It’s the path of least resistance to adhere to the new Part L regulations.

Scotland introduced rules around carbon reduction in new homes in 2016. What has been its experience?
It’s been a game-changer for the use of solar panels in Scotland. In 2016, around 10% of new builds had solar panels, but last year this figure was 70%. There’s no reason why this shouldn’t be the same experience when the rules change in England.

The changes to Part L only affect new builds, so what should landlords consider in terms of retrofitting or planned maintenance in relation to decarbonisation?
The cost of repairing a roof is almost as much as replacing it. If you’ve got planned maintenance and you’re replacing a roof, you need to look at incorporating solar panels. It should be the first thingthat you think about: “How can we get the most value from that roof?” By installing solar panels, it will give you that no-regrets future-proofing for a property, and then you can look at adding additional technologies.

The government aims to install 600,000 heat pumps a year by 2028. How do solar panels fit into that?
We would encourage any social landlord looking to put a heat pump in to think about how it is going to be powered. Solar panels are often used to help run the heat pump. A heat pump on its own could potentially put tenants into deeper fuel poverty if that’s the only source of heat. It’s completely different to what they’re used to and runs solely on electricity. We’ve seen cases where tenants got a heat pump and then still went out and bought electric heaters because they wanted a quick burst of heat when they felt cold. That’s using more electricity and creating additional costs. Although there are many benefits to heat pumps, there’s a lot of capital cost, too – for example, you need a whole new radiator system for them to work properly and the house needs to be well insulated. But heat pumps and solar panels are two very good bedfellows. In our view, you shouldn’t be installing heat pumps without solar panels as well. Afterthoughts tend to cost a lot more money, so make all the considerations at the start of your project.

What are some of the advancements in solar panels?
One of the big ones is solar panels becoming integrated. With integrated solar panels you have a much better, cleaner aesthetic and it’s part of the roof covering, so there’s very little maintenance. The only thing that may be needed is cleaning, but with integrated panels, there’s less likelihood of mess from birds than with bolt-on panels. The raised nature of bolt-on panels gives birds a perfect nesting spot; they often perch on the panel, creating a lot of mess across the roof. The cost has fallen dramatically on solar panels, too, and the power they generate is increasing all the time. When we were installing solar panels back in 2010, they were probably 200 watts or 220 watts peak per panel. Now, for the same size panel, we’re seeing 50% more power out of the same area. We will probably see the energy increase further on panels in the future. A technology that’s widely used to help improve the benefits of solar for the tenant is a PV power diverter, which detects when you’re generating more electricity than you can use and will switch something on in the house. The ‘something’ is often an immersion heater in a hot water tank. So you’re keeping that electricity in the house, and you’re using it to heat up water that you can use in the evening. That’s a really cheap addition to a PV system that enhances the benefit to the tenant. Battery storage is getting a lot more attention too, although it’s still rather pricey and tends to be used more in demonstration projects at the moment.

What has been your experience of how tenants have responded to solar panels?
Our feedback from tenants has been really good, especially as the use of solar panels has increased and people have become more aware of them. The introduction of integrated panels seems to have had a big impact on tenants’ views, as they become a seamless part of the roof and give a good aesthetic finish. Tenants, like other members of the public, are more aware of what’s happening with regard to climate change and energy usage. Tenants not only feel that they’re saving money, but also that they’re having a positive impact on the world around them. It’s important to remember that however small the array of solar panels, it should still save energy for the tenant. Even a small number of appliances using electricity in the background, like things on standby or fridges, can use the electricity that is produced. Every penny saved will help a tenant on low income or affected by fuel poverty.

What do you say to anyone who is worried that solar panels are not suitable for the UK climate?
It’s not heat that solar panels are using, it’s light. The hotter panels get, the less efficient they are, so the UK climate is as good a place as any. They don’t generate quite as much on cloudy days, but they still generate a good amount of electricity.

What would be your overall message to social landlords?
I think the biggest takeaway is just thinking about the planned maintenance and assessing all their housing stock. It may be that they don’t need to rush out and look at putting renewables in everything now. But there could be an opportunity for them to save money by planning it in line with their reroofing schemes. As with any maintenance, the expensive aspect is access and labour, so utilising that to incorporate renewable technologies while making housing upgrades is something to consider, and may save time and money in the long run.

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